San Francisco: Removal of the Embarcadero Freeway | Streetfilms…….

San Francisco also had an ugly, elevated highway running between downtown and the waterfront. After the 1989 earthquake dealt the Embarcadero Freeway a mortal blow, the citizens of the city bucked conventional wisdom and decided to tear down the structure and replace it with a grand boulevard. It wasn’t easy, but as this clip shows, the results were well worth the effort.

We Care A Lot…….

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Good thing the bag fee was defeated.

I know what you are thinking.  Sure, all of those feral plastic bags, blowing down our streets may be a nuisance and eye sore, but what kind of harm can they really do?  Besides, The American Chemical Society told us we had to vote against the bag fee to protect the poor, who just can’t get it together and bring reusable bags to the store while shopping.

Well, here is a little harm for you, courtesy of  The Independent:

The scientists found that when plastics decompose in the ocean they release a range of chemicals, such as bisphenol A and substances known as polystyrene-based (PS) oligomers, which are not found naturally. Bisphenol A has been implicated in disrupting the hormonal system of animals.

A common form of plastic rubbish is styrofoam, which soon gets crushed into small pieces in the sea. However, it also releases substantial quantities of a toxic substances called styrene monomer, which is known to cause cancer, as well as styrene dimers and trimer, which are suspected of being carcinogenic. The trimer also breaks down into the toxic monomer form.

D’oh!

Hypocrisy is the Greatest Luxury…….

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First, The American Chemistry Council spent almost $200,000 to force a referendum vote to reverse an ordinance passed by the Seattle City Council to charge a 20 cent fee for disposable bags, and–now that the election is almost upon us– this same group has coughed up another $1.4 million to finish the job.

It’s the best democracy money can buy.

Luckily, you can still do something about it.  If you live in Seattle, give The American Chemistry Council the finger and vote yes on Referendum 1.  If you can’t vote, click on over to the Green Bag Campaign and lend a hand.